INTERVIEW

Currently in the process of “writing, researching and editing” his forthcoming follow up to October’s debut, ‘The Art Of Fiction,’ while lined up to support Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly and old friends Larrikin Love later this year, 23 year old Jeremy Warmsley is set for a busy 2007. Eager to mess with the status quo of […]

Currently in the process of “writing, researching and editing” his forthcoming follow up to October’s debut, ‘The Art Of Fiction,’ while lined up to support Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly and old friends Larrikin Love later this year, 23 year old Jeremy Warmsley is set for a busy 2007.

Eager to mess with the status quo of the traditional LP format, north London based Jeremy’s next album is set to be an album of two halves; one in the more familiar pop format – a collection of fairly unrelated songs – the other a continuous narrative. “I like the idea of not conforming to old limitations, 8 track tapes and 12″ records. It’s not necessarily the best way to listen to music, just technically the easiest. I like the idea of being able to listen to either half and for it to make sense. But the continuous narrative is proving very difficult,” states Warmsley. “I’ve spent about six months writing it and I’m now thinking, ‘hmm, maybe I’ll start again‚””‘

Yet the art of storytelling is not unfamiliar to Jeremy, with ‘The Art of Fiction’ featuring, as its title suggests, a fair few stories of its own. Although Jeremy is keen not to be pigeonholed solely as a storyteller.

“A lot of people thought of the last album as a collection of stories, but I’m not sure that’s the case. I suppose they’re a lot closer to stories than a lot of bands, who write with a ‘I feel like this, then this happens, then I feel like this‚”‘ style, with a repeated catchphrase for the chorus that doesn’t really have much to do with anything, but then for something to be a story implies a beginning, middle and an end. There are three tracks on the album I do think of as stories- ‘I Promise’, ‘Jonathan and the oak tree’, and obviously ‘5 Verses’. But then there’s ‘Hush,’ which is one phrase repeated for 4 minutes and definitely not a story.”

Undeniably a tale in the traditional sense is the B-side to Jeremy’s latest single release, ‘Dirty Blue Jeans’. The track, ‘Photograph of a Hospital,’ is inspired by the winning short story of a competition set up by Warmsley. It’s the tale of what Jeremy describes as “a minor tragedy in someone’s life that turns out not to be a tragedy at all. You know how you spend ages worrying about something, then it happens and it’s not so bad, but then a while later you realise it was even worse than you’d thought.”

Warmsley is an integral part of the current influx of young singer-songwriters, with the likes of Jamie T, Liam Frost, Patrick Wolf and Emmy the Great taking ‘singer-songwriter’ back from the James Blunts of the world. “There’s huge rivalry,” jokes the Transgressive hot signing. “It’s like a cross between a marathon and a boxing ring. On jet skis.” Perhaps it’s the vast differences in sound – Warmsley’s lush, electronic folk is as different from the music of his peers as they are from each other – that removes any tooth-and-claw rivalry, and creates instead something of a community. “As for Liam Frost, Patrick Wolf and Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly, in interviews a year ago I didn’t know them at all but now, we’ve met. But Emmy lives practically next door to me so I’ve known her for years, and there was a time where myself, Larrikin Love and Jamie T played on the same bill together for about a month.”

Which also explains Jeremy’s remix for the B-side of Larrikin Love’s single, ‘Well, Love Does Furnish A Life’. “I’ve known those guys for years (and their A&R man is married to my manager). Besides, I love doing remixes. I could listen to any piece of music and tell you what I’d like to change about it, so it’s nice to actually be able to do that. Although, with things you really, really love it’s more difficult to change, so you have to just dress it up. With Larrikin Love, I’ve given it an eye patch and a tutu. Taught it some new dance moves.”

Another aspect Warmsley shares with several other songwriters in the current musical climate – and Jamie T in particular – is his largely DIY technique. The majority of ‘The Art of Fiction’ was recorded in his house, the exceptions being ‘I Believe In The Way You Move’ and ‘I Promise,’ both of which were recorded at a studio in Clapham. “Everything is mixed at home though, which is what for me really takes the time – finding all the funny little ideas and tricks that are going to take it from being a bunch of musicians playing at the same time to something a bit more magical.”

He is also adamant that “you don’t need a studio to get a highly produced sound. Hot Chip, The Shins, they do most of their recording at home,” he argues “and although studios can be nice, you give up an element of control. But then recording on your own can be a bit like being in Space. You’re sitting fiddling around with a song then you suddenly realise ages have passed, and your friends have got married and things outside have‚” moved on” – something that there is little doubt of Jeremy Warmsley mirroring.

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