INTERVIEW

“”I was on Capital FM’s ‘Drive Time’ today,” beams a proud Kate Nash, shortly after tip-toeing on stage to the juiciest of remixes of her new single, ‘Foundations’. Later the self-taught-best-hair-cut-in-new-music will of course play the recorded funeral pyre of a modern love song the way you would have seen it done on Later With‚” […]

“”I was on Capital FM’s ‘Drive Time’ today,” beams a proud Kate Nash, shortly after tip-toeing on stage to the juiciest of remixes of her new single, ‘Foundations’. Later the self-taught-best-hair-cut-in-new-music will of course play the recorded funeral pyre of a modern love song the way you would have seen it done on Later With‚” And it’ll show Nash to be every bit the evolving songstress we hoped she’d prove to be. But for now the ICA’s sometime cinema room is deadly silent as Nash nervously has a bash at living up the immense hype around her.

The LDN backlash aside, Nash can surely not believe her luck. A blink of an eye ago she was a young aspiring actor, hoping to score a place at drama school. Now she’s selling out any venue she visits, her name in lights above her head (literally – tonight’s stage dress is a tasteful pink neon light, spelling the singer’s name).

As for the music snob’s post-Lily Allen 180 regarding all thing London and everyday youth culture hat-tipping, this evening will prove exactly that to be the case: largely the views of people who can’t possible be associated with an artist or band that have quickly risen in popularity. The myspace parody hit ‘LDN Is A Victim’ is one thing (one funny, well thought out piece of musical comedy thing, to be honest) but those who don’t see Kate Nash for what she is have obviously not seen her live.

With the help of session synth, guitar and bass player and a rather amazing drummer, Nash sits behind her electric keyboard for the big hitters in her live set. She stabs out simple chords like an inexperienced, un-tutored pianist would, before her fingers seem to be struck by lightning, zapped into life to make us doubt any biography other than that mentioning how she first played the piano when she was 6 months old.
Her songs are largely about boys, relationships and either love for boys and relationships or distain for them. Swearing like a sailor, her vocals are more powerful than perhaps they should be coming from the sweet teenager. Nobody speaks for fear of missing an important twist in each song’s plot and the fact that certain numbers consist of bars and choruses in which Nash chirps at twice the speed of a pilled up Vicky Pollard simply causes ears to cock closer to the stage.

As she swaps the keys for six acoustic strings Nash mixes it up. The blatantly titled ‘Dickhead’ is still the stripped bare street poet folk song that you may have heard on myspace but now it seems to saunter. It’s sexier and more serious, despite the underlying question of “what you being a dickhead for”.

But it’s debut limited single ‘Caroline Is A Victim’ that is totally turned on its head. No longer an indie-techno outing it’s played as an unrecognisable racing acoustic, drums and bass pop song. Hopefully it doesn’t signify that Kate Nash is letting those critics of her tongue-in-cheek cult hit get to her but is rather a tool to prove that she is a bonafide singer/songwriter. A talent.

It’s hard to think of a time when Kate Nash will have an easy ride with the fashionistas and hoards that many feel her songs are aimed at. But after tonight it’s less the case. Yes, Kate Nash was discovered via myspace. And yes, it’s now considered the equivalent to going on Big Brother to launch a TV presenting career. But when myspace dies (gasp!) this genre dodging/welding artist won’t as easily. And even if myspace does live forever (phew!) those who are currently judging by how many friend request a band gets, or weather someone is mentioned in NME or not, will either get over their primary coloured jeans and themselves of miss out. Either way Kate Nash should keep on keeping on, making pop music that’s worthy of the hype. “

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