INTERVIEW

“WE FIRST HEARD THE WHIP on the third compilation album from lauded Parisian trendsetting label Kitsune Maison. Their signature tune ‘Trash’ sticks out like a goth in a Calais cash’n’carry. Its sexually charged, minimal vocals and hedonistic lyrics, against an incessantly jerky melody, a grizzly throb of bass and relentless stomp of drums, could halt […]

“WE FIRST HEARD THE WHIP on the third compilation album from lauded Parisian trendsetting label Kitsune Maison. Their signature tune ‘Trash’ sticks out like a goth in a Calais cash’n’carry. Its sexually charged, minimal vocals and hedonistic lyrics, against an incessantly jerky melody, a grizzly throb of bass and relentless stomp of drums, could halt rigor mortis.

But The Whip almost didn’t happen. Best buds Danny and Bruce almost made their mark with their first musical venture Nylon Pylon, drummer Lil Fee and bassist Nathan Sudders’ romantic relations broke down almost as soon as they joined the band together and their dingy practice room was haunted, with all manner of objects falling off the walls onto them. It’s a good job the spirit world spared them. Like a Mancunian No Doubt, the whippers pulled through and they’ve come out the other end sounding like they’ve had a gigantic electric jolt up the arse.

Bruce assures that he is a lot happier with The Whip than its previous incarnation and that the break-up issues were not a problem: “They split up when we started doing stuff and I thought, ‘Oh my God, it’s going to be a nightmare,’ but they’re such cool people, it’s not an issue at all.” Rather it’s Bruce and Nathan that spark the performance fireworks on stage. “I love flirting with Nath,” admits the former. “I’m not gay but I give him some pelvic thrustage when I’m playing the keyboard – he likes that. He’ll shoot me with an imaginary bow and arrow.”

Despite some lazy journo types referring to their live performances as ‘one long chain of bleughhh’ and their electro noodlings as ‘restrictive’, Bruce insists that they like to keep the performance antics inventive (“I squirted some water at Fee once,” he grins “I forgot about all the electrical equipment‚””), even if a lot of folks have got The Whip all wrong, some lumping them in with that spawn of Satan genre, New Rave. “It seems like a silly fad that doesn’t even really exist,” remarks Bruce, “but I did go to bed the other night with a glow stick in my hand. Someone gave it to me.”

Moreover, the foursome is constantly compared to New Order, albeit a feistier, more energetic version. They’re both from the same town, both create danceable indie rock and both are tied in closely to their respective club circuits. But despite these musical parallels, each Whip song remains exclusive from the next. On tracks like new single ‘Muzzle No.1’ and ‘Trash’ their European electro influences – Soulwax being the immediate comparison – are glaringly apparent but ‘Frustration’ stands out like an eighties science boffin at a Wham! concert. But despite their live sound and rockin’ element, The Whip are essentially a club band with ‘nice bits’. “People are well up for it in the clubs and everyone wants to get fucked up, so they’re really receptive,” says Bruce. “People can really go off to the tunes and it’s great when clubbers give it some welly in front of yer.” And their choice of record producer says it all.

While most up and coming indie bands might lean towards the crystal clear polish of knob-twiddlers like Paul Epworth, The Whip have set their sights on “sound” British mashup royalty Simian Mobile Disco, who they hope will put the finishing touches to their first album. Like gold dust to club promoters, duo SMD are currently brushing up a Whip track they laid down. “The recorded stuff’s OK, but I can’t wait to make a proper wicked album that I’m dead happy with,” admits Bruce. “It’s nearly written and I think we’ll probably end up recording it some time over the summer.”

Die hard Whip fans will have a while to wait, but from the smattering of material being bandied about already you just know that their album is going to set dancefloors from London to Manchester on fire. Here at L&Q towers, we just can’t wait to get lashed.

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5 BANDS TO MAKE YOU DANCE WITHOUT SOUNDING LIKE FRANZ

LO-FI-FNK

Male Swedish duo Lo-Fi-Fnk are all about slapping a Cheshire smile on your chops with the aid of euphoric beats and synths, best listened to in the sunshine. If one track acts as the perfect Lo-Fi-Fnk sales pitch to a summer of endless parties, it’s the anthemic ‘Change Channels’.

METRONOMY
If you like your dance music to induce a self-soiling as opposed to daft E’d up grin, Metronomy’s dark squelches and squeals are for you. Try ‘Trick Or Treat’ and you’ll realise that whatever answer you give, you’re no doubt going to end up changing your kecks.

AHUMAN
Ahuman bring the groove. But, as ‘Black Moon Dark Night’ shows, their true powers lie in bringing lyricisms to dance music like never before, along with much missed humour to clubland.

FOALS
Transgressive Records gain is Modular’s vast loss. When Foals signed their carnival-of-the-future arses to the Transgressive boys, they raised the label’s game ten fold, bringing the best house party tunes of 2007 with them – see the front room electro jitterbug of ‘Hammer’ for evidence.

LATE OF THE PIER
Bands that sound more 80’s than a Brandon Flowers wet dream, circa 2005, really shouldn’t be as appealing as Late Of The Pier certainly are. ‘Space And The Woods’ makes Gary Numan’s ‘Cars’ seem dull and unoriginal.

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